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David R. Williams

David R. Williams

Professor, Department of Society, Human Development and Health
Harvard School of Public Health
dwilliam@hsph.harvard.edu
http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/faculty/david-williams/


David R. Williams is the Florence Sprague Norman and Laura Smart Norman Professor of Public Health at the Harvard School of Public Health and Professor of African and African American Studies and of Sociology at Harvard University. His prior academic appointments were at the University of Michigan and Yale University. He is interested in social influences on health and has examined the trends and determinants of socioeconomic and racial differences in health. His research also addresses the ways in which racism can affect health and the effects of religious involvement on health. The Everyday Discrimination scale that he developed is currently one of the most widely used measures to assess perceived discrimination in health studies. In recent years, he has been increasingly interested in understanding the biological pathways that link acute and chronic exposures in the psychosocial and physical environment to health status. The author of more than 250 papers in scientific journals and edited collections, he has served as a member of the editorial board of 12 scientific journals and as a reviewer for more than 60 others. He was ranked as one of the Top 10 Most Cited Researchers in the Social Sciences during the decade 1995 to 2005 and as the Most Cited Black Scholar in the Social Sciences in 2008. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was also a key scientific advisor to the award-winning PBS film series, Unnatural Causes: Is inequality Making Us Sick?.



Representative Publications
Slopen, N., Chen, Y., Priest, N., Albert, M. A., & Williams, D. R. (2016). Emotional and instrumental support during childhood and biological dysregulation in midlife. Preventive Medicine, 84, 90-96.
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Boehm, J. K., Chen, Y., Williams, D. R., Ryff, C. D., & Kubzansky, L. D. (2016). Subjective well-being and cardiometabolic health: An 8-11 year study of midlife adults. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 85, 1-8.
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Boehm, J. K., Chen, Y., Williams, D. R., Ryff, C., & Kubzansky, L. D. (2015). Unequally distributed psychological assets: Are there social disparities in optimism, life satisfaction, and positive affect? PLoS ONE, 10(2), 1-16.
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Bailey, Z. D., Slopen, N., Albert, M., & Williams, D. R. (2015). Multidimensional religious involvement and tobacco smoking patterns over 9-10 years: A prospective study of middle-aged adults in the United States. Social Science & Medicine, 138, 128-135.
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Boehm, J. K., Williams, D. R., Rimm, E., Ryff, C. D., & Kubzansky, L. D. (2013). The association between optimism and serum antioxidants in the Midlife in the United States Study. Psychosomatic Medicine, 75(1), 2-10.
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Boehm, J. K., Williams, D. R., Rimm, E. B., Ryff, C., & Kubzansky, L. D. (2013). Relation between optimism and lipids in midlife. The American Journal of Cardiology, 111(10), 1425-1431.
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Fuller-Rowell, T. E., Love, G. D., Williams, D. R., McKinely, P. S., Sloan, R. P., & Ryff, C. D. (2013). Race differences in age trends of autonomic nervous system functioning. Journal of Aging and Health, 25(5), 839-862.
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Slopen, N., Kontos, E. Z., Ryff, C. D., Ayanian, J. Z., Albert, M. A., & Williams, D. R. (2013). Psychosocial stress and cigarette smoking persistence, cessation, and relapse over 9-10 years: A prospective study of middle-aged adults in the United States. Cancer Causes & Control, 24(10), 1849-1863.
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Slopen, N., Dutra, L. M., Williams, D. R., Mujahid, M. S., Lewis, T. T., Bennett, G. G., Ryff, C. D., Albert, M. A. (2012). Psychosocial stressors and cigarette smoking among African American adults in midlife. Nicotine and Tobacco Research, 14(10), 1161-1169.
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Slopen, N., Lewis, T. T., Gruenewald, T. L., Mujahid, M. S., Ryff, C. D., Albert, M. A., & Williams, D. R. (2010). Early life adversity and inflammation in African Americans and Whites in the Midlife in the United States survey. Psychosomatic Medicine, 42(7), 694-701.
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Williams, D.R., McClellan, M.B., & Rivlin, A.M. (2010). Beyond the Affordable Care Act: Achieving real improvements in Americans' health. Health Affairs, 29(8), 1481-1488.

Williams, D.R., Mohammed, S.A., Leavell, J., & Collins, C. (2010). Race, socioeconomic status & health: Complexities, ongoing challenges & research opportunities. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1186, 69-101.

Friedman, E.M., Williams, D.R., Singer, B.H., & Ryff, C.D. (2009). Chronic discrimination predicts higher circulating levels of E-selectin in a national sample: The MIDUS study. Brain, Behavior & Immunity, 23(5), 684-692.
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Williams, D.R., & Mohammed, S.A. (2009). Discrimination & racial disparities in health, evidence & needed research. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 32, 20-47.

Williams, D.R., Gonzalez, H.M., Williams, S., Mohammed, S.A., Moomal, H, Stein, D.J. (2008). Perceived discrimination, race & health in South Africa: Findings from the South Africa Stress & Health Study. Social Science & Medicine, 67, 441-452.

Williams, D.R., Haile, R., Gonzalez, H., Neighbors, H., Baser, R., & Jackson, J.S. (2007). The mental health of Black Caribbean immigrants: Results from the National Survey of American Life (NSAL). American Journal of Public Health, 97(1), 52-59.

Karlamangla, A.S., Singer, B., Williams, D., Schwartz, J., Matthews, K., Kiefe, C., & Seeman, TE. (2005). Impact of socioeconomic status on longitudinal accumulation of cardiovascular risk factors in young adults: The CARDIA Study. Social Science and Medicine, 60, 999-1015.

Williams, D.R. (2005). The health of U. S. racial & ethnic populations. Journals of Gerontology, Series B, 60B(Special Issue II), 53-62.

Musick, M.A., House, J.S., & Williams, D.R. (2004). Attendance at religious services & mortality in a national sample. Journal of Health & Social Behavior, 45(2), 198-213.

Williams, D.R. (2003). The health of men: Structured inequalities & opportunities. American Journal of Public Health, 93(5), 724-731.

Williams, D.R. & Collins, C. (2001). Racial residential segregation: A fundamental cause of racial disparities in health. Public Health Reports, 116, 404-416. Reprinted in Thomas A. LaVeist (Ed.), Race, Ethnicity, & Health. Jossey Bass, 2002.

Kessler, R. C., Mickelson, K. D., & Williams, D. R. (1999). The prevalence, distribution, and mental health correlates of perceived discrimination in the United States. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 40(3), 208-230.
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Williams, D.R. (1999). Race, socioeconomic status, and health: The added effects of racism & discrimination. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 896, 173-188.

Williams, D.R., Griffith, E.E.H., Young, J., Collins, C., & Dodson, J. (1999). Structure & provision of services in New Haven Black churches. Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology, 5(2), 118-133.

Krieger, N., Williams, D.R., & Moss, N. (1997). Measuring social class in U.S. public health research: Concepts, methodologies, and guidelines. Annual Review of Public Health, 18, 341-378.

Williams, D.R. (1997). Race and health: Basic questions, emerging directions. Annals of Epidemiology, 7(5), 322-333.

Williams, D.R., Yu, Y., Jackson, J.S., & Anderson, N.B. (1997). Racial differences in physical & mental health: Socioeconomic status, stress, & discrimination. Journal of Health Psychology, 2(3), 335-351.

Williams, D.R., & Collins, C. (1995). U.S. socioeconomic & racial differences in health: Patterns & explanations. Annual Review of Sociology, 21, 349-386.

Williams, D.R. (1990). Socioeconomic differentials in health: A review & redirection. Social Psychology Quarterly, 53, 81-99.
©2011 University of Wisconsin - Madison, Institute on Aging