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Patricia Tun

Patricia Tun

Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of Psychology
Brandeis University
tun@brandeis.edu
http://www.bio.brandeis.edu/memlab/tun.php


Dr. Patricia Tun serves as Associate Director of the Memory and Cognition Laboratory at Brandeis University. She has a long-standing interest in cognitive aging, and has carried out extensive NIH-funded research that investigates changes in memory and language across the lifespan. Her work has focused primarily on adult age-related changes in processing spoken language, such as sentences and meaningful discourse, and the role of attention and memory in processing spoken materials. She has published numerous chapters and journal articles on these topics. Dr. Tun has a particular interest in teasing apart the relative contributions of hearing ability and cognitive abilities to the individual differences found in memory for speech in adulthood. As a MIDUS investigator, she studies biopsychosocial influences on cognition in midlife and old age, and factors that contribute to successful cognitive aging. Currently her work focuses on memory, attention, and executive control processes such as task-switching, and how these abilities relate to factors such as education, activities, lifestyle, stress, and social engagement.



Representative Publications
Crowley, O. V., Kimhy, D., McKinley, P. S., Burg, M. M., Schwartz, J. E., Lachman, M. E., Tun, P. A., Ryff, C. D., Seeman, T. E., & Sloan, R. P. (2016). Vagal recovery from cognitive challenge moderates age-related deficits in executive functioning. Research on Aging, 38(4), 504-525.
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Karlamangla, A. S., Miller-Martinez, D., Lachman, M. E., Tun, P. A., Koretz, A., & Seeman, T. M. (2014). Biological correlates of adult cognition: Midlife in the United States (MIDUS). Neurobiology of Aging, 35(2), 387-394.
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Lachman, M. E., Agrigoroaei, S., Tun, P. A., & Weaver, S. L. (2014). Monitoring cognitive functioning: Psychometric properties of the Brief Test of Adult Cognition by Telephone. Assessment, 1(4), 404-417.
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Tun, P. A., Miller-Martinez, D., Lachman, M. E., & Seeman, T. (2013). Social strain and executive function across the lifespan: The dark (and light) sides of social engagement. Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition, 20(3), 320-338.
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Kimhy, D., Crowley, O. V., McKinley, P. S., Burg, M. M., Lachman, M. E., Tun, P. A., Ryff, C. D., Seeman, T. E., & Sloan, R. P. (2013). The association of cardiac vagal control and executive functioning- findings from the MIDUS study. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 47(5), 628-635.
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Seeman, T. E., Miller-Martinez, D. M., Stein Merkin, S., Lachman, M. E., Tun, P. A., & Karlamangla, A. S. (2011). Histories of social engagement and adult cognition: Midlife in the US study. Journals of Gerontology. Series B, Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, 66B(Suppl 1), i141-i152.
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Stawski, R. S., Almeida, D. M., Lachman, M. E., Tun, P. A., Rosnick, C. B., & Seeman, T. (2011). Associations between cognitive function and naturally occurring daily cortisol during middle adulthood: Timing is everything. The Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, 66B(suppl 1), i71-i81.
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Stawski, R.S., Almeida, D.M., Lachman, M.E., Tun, P.A., & Rosnick, D.B. (2010). Fluid cognitive ability is associated with greater exposure and smaller reactions to daily stressors. Psychology & Aging, 25(2), 330-342.
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Lachman, M. E., Agrigoroaei, S., Murphy, C., & Tun, P. A. (2010). Frequent cognitive activity compensates for education differences in episodic memory. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 18(1), 4-10.
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Tun, P. A., & Lachman, M. E. (2010). The association between computer use and cognition across adulthood: Use it so you won't lose it? Psychology and Aging, 25(3), 560-568.
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Tun, P.A., Benichov, J., & Wingfield, A. (2010). Response latencies in auditory sentence comprehension: Effects of linguistic versus perceptual challenge. Psychology and Aging, 25, 730-735.

Tun, P.A., McCoy, S., & Wingfield, A. (2009). Adult aging, hearing acuity, and the attentional costs of effortful listening. Psychology and Aging, 24, 761-766.

Lachman, M.E., & Tun, P.A. (2008). Cognitive testing in large-scale surveys: Assessment by telephone. In S. Hofer & D. Alwin (Eds.). Handbook on Cognitive Aging: Interdisciplinary Perspectives (pp. 506-522). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publication.

Tun, P.A., & Lachman, M.E. (2008). Age differences in reaction time and attention in a national telephone sample of adults: Education, sex, and task complexity matter. Developmental Psychology, 44(5), 1421-1429.
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Wingfield, A., & Tun, P.A. (2007). Cognitive supports and cognitive constraints on comprehension of spoken language. Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, 18, 567-577.

Tun, P. A., & Lachman, M. E. (2006). Telephone assessment of cognitive function in adulthood: The Brief Test of Adult Cognition by Telephone (BTACT). Age & Ageing, 35, 629-932.

Wingfield, A., Tun, P.A., McCoy, S.L., Stewart, R.A., & Cox, L.C. (2006). Sensory and cognitive constraints in comprehension of spoken language in adult aging. Seminars in Hearing, 27, 273-283.

Wingfield, A., Tun, P.A., & McCoy, S.L. (2005). Hearing loss in adulthood: What it is and how it interacts with cognitive performance. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 14, 144-148.

McCoy, S.L., Tun, P.A., Cox, L.C., Colangelo, M., Stewart, R.A., & Wingfield, A. (2005). Hearing loss and perceptual effort: Downstream effects on older adults' memory for speech. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 58A, 22-33.

Tun, P.A., O'Kane, G., & Wingfield, A. (2002). Distraction by competing speech in younger and older listeners. Psychology and Aging, 17, 453-467.

Tun, P.A., & Wingfield, A. (1999). One voice too many: Adult age differences in language processing with different types of distracting sounds. Journals of Gerontology. Series B, Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, 54B, P317-P327.

Tun, P. A., Wingfield, A., Rosen, M. J., & Blanchard, L. (1998). Response latencies for false memories; Gist-based processes in normal aging. Psychology and Aging, 13, 230-241.

Tun, P. A. (1998). Fast noisy speech: Age differences in processing rapid speech with background noise. Psychology and Aging, 13, 424-434.

Tun, P.A., & Wingfield, A. (1995). Does dividing attention become harder with age? Findings from the Divided Attention Questionnaire. Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition, 2, 39-66.

Tun, P.A., & Wingfield, A. (1994). Speech recall under heavy load conditions: Age, predictability, and limits on dual-task interference. Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition, 1, 29-44.
©2011 University of Wisconsin - Madison, Institute on Aging