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Nadine F. Marks

Nadine F. Marks

Professor Emerita, Department of Human Development and Family Studies
University of Wisconsin-Madison
marks@ssc.wisc.edu
http://aging.wisc.edu/research/affil.php?Ident=42


Professor Marks' research is motivated by an interest in how a number of psychosocial factors-- psychological factors, socioeconomic status, social relationship quality, caregiving, family structure, spirituality, the work/family interface-- influence adult physical and mental health and development. Additionally, she examines how gender and age moderate the importance of these various factors in determining health. Life course and ecological theoretical perspectives guide her work. She works with the research teams collecting data for the Wisconsin Longitudinal Survey and the National Survey of Families and Households, as well as the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS). Professor Marks has been the recipient of a NIH FIRST Award, and participated as a Project Director for one of the projects funded as part of the UW Center on Mind/Body Interactions. She recently completed work on a project continuing her research program studying "Social Inequalities, Psychosocial Factors, and Health," with funding from the National Institute on Aging. She was a Network Associate with the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation's Research Network on Successful Midlife Development, which developed the first wave of the MIDUS study.



Representative Publications
Kang, S., & Marks, N. F. (2016). Marital strain exacerbates health risks of filial caregiving: Evidence from the 2005 National Survey of Midlife in the US. Journal of Family Issues, 37(8), 1123-1150.
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Kang, S., & Marks, N. F. (2014). Filial caregiving is associated with greater neuroendocrine dysfunction: Evidence from the 2005 national Survey of Midlife in the US. SAGE Open Medicine. Advance online publication.
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Kang, S., & Marks, N. F. (2014). Parental caregiving for a child with special needs, marital strain, and physical health: Evidence from National Survey of Midlife in the U.S. 2005. In J. Higgins McCormick & S. L. Blair (Eds.), Family relationships and familial responses to health issues (pp. 183-209). Bingly, UK: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.
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Choi, H., & Marks, N. F. (2011). Socioeconomic status, marital status continuity and change, marital conflict, and mortality. Journal of Aging and Health, 23, 714-742.

Greenfield, E. A., & Marks, N. F. (2010). Sense of community as a protective factor against long-term psychological effects of childhood violence. Social Service Review, 84(1), 129-147.
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Greenfield, E. A., & Marks, N. F. (2010). Identifying experiences of physical and psychological violence in childhood that jeopardize mental health in adulthood. Child Abuse & Neglect, 34(3), 161-171.
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Greenfield, E.A., & Marks, N.F. (2009). Profiles of physical and psychological violence in childhood as a risk factor for poorer adult health: Evidence from the 1995-2005 National Survey of Midlife in the US. Journal of Aging & Health, 21(7), 943-966.
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Greenfield, E.A., & Marks, N.F. (2009). Violence from parents in childhood and obesity in adulthood: Using food in response to stress as a mediator of risk. Social Science & Medicine, 68, 791-798.
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Greenfield, E. A., Vaillant, G. E., & Marks, N. F. (2009). Do formal religious participation and spiritual perceptions have independent linkages with diverse dimensions of psychological well-being? J Health Soc Behav, 50(2), 196-212.
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Marks, N. F., & Song, J. (2009). Compassionate love and compassionate acts across the life course: Results from US national studies. In L. Underwood, S. Sprecher & B. Fehr (Eds.), The science of compassionate love: Research, theory and application (pp. 121-158). Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.

Choi, H., & Marks, N. F. (2008). Marital conflict, depressive symptoms, and functional impairment. Journal of Marriage and Family, 70, 377-390.

Marks, N. F., Lambert, J. D., Jun, H., & Song, J. (2008). Psychosocial moderators of the effects of transitioning into filial caregiving on mental and physical health. Research on Aging, 30, 358-380.

Greenfield, Emily A. & Marks, Nadine F (2007). Religious social identity as an explanatory factory for associations between more frequent formal religious participation and psychological well-being. International Journal for the Psychology of Religion, 17(3), 245-259.
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Song, J., Marks, N.F., & Han, G. (2007). Work, family, work-family spillover and mental health among working adults: A comparison of data from national surveys in Korea and the U.S. Family and Culture (Journal of Korean Family Studies Association), 19(2), 61-92.
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Greenfield, E. A., & Marks, N. F. (2007). Continuous participation in voluntary groups as a protective factor for the psychological well-being of adults who develop functional limitations: Evidence from the National Survey of Families and Households. Journals of Gerontology. Series B, Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, 62B, S60-S68.

Marks, N. F., Jun, H., & Song, J. (2007). Death of parents and adult psychological and physical health: A prospective U.S. national study. Journal of Family Issues, 28, 1611-1628.

Greenfield, E. A. & Marks, N. F. (2006). Linked lives: Adult children's problems and their parents' psychological and relational well-being. Journal of Marriage & Family, 68, 442-454.
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Choi, H., & Marks, N. F. (2006). Transitions to caregiving, marital disagreement, and psychological well-being: A prospective U.S. national study. Journal of Family Issues, 27, 1701-1722.

Greenfield, E. A., & Marks, N. (2004). Formal volunteering as a protective factor for older adults' psychological well-being. Journals of Gerontology: Series B: Psychological Sciences & Social Sciences, 59B(5), S258-S264.
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Marks, N. F., Bumpass, L. L., & Jun, H. (2004). Family roles and well-being during the middle life course. In O. G. Brim, C. D. Ryff & R. C. Kessler (Eds.), How healthy are we?: A national study of well-being at midlife (pp. 514-549). Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.
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Marks, N.F., Lambert J.D., & Choi, H. (2002). Transitions to caregiving, gender, and psychological well-being: Prospective evidence from a U.S. national study. Journal of Marriage and Family, 64, 657-667.

Marks, N.F., & Choi, H. (2002). Social inequalities, psychological well-being, and health: Longitudinal evidence from a U.S. national study. Research on the Sociology of Health Care, 20, 79-106.

Grzywacz, J. G., & Marks, N. F. (2001). Social inequalities and exercise during adulthood: Toward an ecological perspective. Journal of Health & Social Behavior, 42(2), 202-220.
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Grzywacz, J. G., & Marks, N. F. (2000). Reconceptualizing the work-family interface: An ecological perspective on the correlates of positive and negative spillover between work and family. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 5(1), 111-126.
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Grzywacz, J. G., & Marks, N. F. (2000). Family, work, work-family spillover, and problem drinking during midlife. Journal of Marriage & the Family, 62(2), 336-348.
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Grzywacz, J. G., & Marks, N. F. (1999). Family solidarity and health behaviors: Evidence from the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States. Journal of Family Issues, 20(2), 243-268.
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Marmot, M. G., Fuhrer, R., Ettner, S. L., Marks, N. F., Bumpass, L. L., & Ryff, C. D. (1998). Contribution of psychosocial factors to socioeconomic differences in health. Milbank Quarterly, 76(3), 403-448.
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Marks, N.F., & Lambert, J.D. (1998). Marital status continuity and change among young and midlife adults: Longitudinal effects on psychological well-being. Journal of Family Issues, 19, 652-686.

Marks, N.F. (1998). Does it hurt to care? Caregiving, work-family conflict, and midlife well-being. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 60, 951-966.
©2011 University of Wisconsin - Madison, Institute on Aging